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Posted by Luis Dominguez on 2018-09-01
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Mexico’s Next Big Thing: The Sea of Cortez Nautical Ladder

Sea Of Cortez Nautical Ladder

The Sea of Cortes Nautical Ladder is a mega-project originally designed by the Mexican Federal Government back in 2001. That’s why some cynics now call it “Mexico’s Last Big Thing”, but here we are a bit more optimistic and understand that this kind of projects takes some time to develop. The idea behind the Nautical Ladder was to tap the huge marine industry of California and use it to develop the Baja Californias and the coastal states of the Sea of Cortes. The project envisioned 27 marinas in total, thousands of hotel rooms, new roads and even a ‘land bridge’ to save time and take your vessel across the peninsula through a paved shortcut where heavy trucks would transport yachts and small ships from the Pacific Ocean to the Sea of Cortes.

What happened?

Well, first the project faced several delays in its development, then the 2008 crash happened and everything was put on hold. Mexico’s tourism industry faced its own perfect storm in 2009 with the slowdown of the global economy, the flu epidemic, and the war on drugs. Since then, the industry has fully recovered and its booming right now, producing the best numbers in tourism in Mexico ever. So, it was just natural that with this new, more positive circumstances, the Federal Government would look to bring back to life its most important project since the inception of Cancun.

Back in 2014, the Government started to look for funding of the project and has been working on finishing the Port of Santa Rosaliíta, the western end of the so-called land bridge. As of today, the Federal Tourism Promotion Fund (Fonatur) that created tourism hotspots such as Cancun, Huatulco, and Cabo, manages 7 marinas in the region without even taking into account the new one at Santa Rosaliíta and those in Cabo that are managed by private investors.

Villa Renata Santa Carmela

from $ US 2.600 /Night
Welcome to Villa Renata, where endless vistas of the Sea of Cortez and the brilliant Baja skies above inspire true [more]
Welcome to Villa Renata, where endless vistas of the Sea of Cortez and the brilliant Baja skies above inspire true [more]
77.5full info
Rentals
pay 5 stay 7 nights

Villa Esquina

From $ US 1.200 /Night
Villa Esquina is split-level villa located on the 1st green of the Nicklaus golf course in Cabo del Sol.  The villa [more]
Villa Esquina is split-level villa located on the 1st green of the Nicklaus golf course in Cabo del Sol.  The villa [more]
54.5full info

Villa Alta Vista Pedregal

from $ US 1.500 /Night
Brand new 7700 square feet ultra luxury home in the gated community of Pedregal, Villa Alta Vista is located at the [more]
Brand new 7700 square feet ultra luxury home in the gated community of Pedregal, Villa Alta Vista is located at the [more]
46 7 700,00 ft2full info

So that’s a beginning. The curse of the Nautical Ladder was its grand ambitions and way too optimistic forecasts. But the idea has its merits and the potential is there. The problem was that with the Nautical Ladder the Government tried to go from step 2 to step 8 in the ladder with one big jump. But the economics of the project brought it down to reality. And that’s a good thing, as now the Nautical Ladder has been growing organically as it should have from the beginning. Let’s see how the market receives the Santa Rosaliíta Port and build on that.

Nautical Ladder Baja California

The Sea Of Cortez Nautical Ladder

There are over 1 million vessels parked at different ports throughout the states of California, Oregon, and Washington in the US. That’s a huge opportunity for a country like Mexico that can offer warmer weather and beautiful beaches all year round. The problem is not the project in itself, but the way it was pushed forward by the Government, without the funding needed to make it happen. Let’s hope they’ve learned from the mistakes and that the Nautical Ladder becomes a reality one day, and that it helps to bring progress to this underdeveloped region of Mexico.

Blog Headline: Mexico’s Next Big Thing: The Sea of Cortez Nautical Ladder Blog Description: The Sea of Cortes Nautical Ladder is a mega-project originally designed by the Mexican Federal Government back in 2001. That’s why some cynics now call it “Mexico’s Last Big Thing”, but here we are a bit more optimistic and understand that this kind of projects takes some time to develop. Published Date: 2018-09-01T12:30:00 Modified Date: 2018-09-01T12:30:00 Image URL: https://villaexperience.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Sea-of-Cortez-Nautical-Ladder.jpg Image Width: 2020 Image Height: 1000 Publisher Name: Oliver Weickardt Logo URL: https://villaexperience.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/vem-logo.png Logo Width: 500 Logo Height: 500
Luis Dominguez
Luis Domínguez is a freelance writer and independent journalist. Interested in travel, art, books, history, philosophy, politics and sports. He has written for Fodor’s, Yahoo!, Sports Illustrated, Telemundo, Villa Experience, MexResorts, ONE Magazine and PV Pulse, among other brands of print and digital media in Europe and North America. Luis has a Master’s Degree in Humanities from the Universidad Francisco de Vitoria from Madrid, Spain; and a Bachelor’s Degree in Communications from the Tecnológico de Monterrey. A global citizen, Luis has lived in some of the largest and most vibrant cities in the world, including London, Madrid and Mexico City. Currently lives in Playa del Carmen, México, where he is the Middle School Director of an International School and writes in English and Spanish for different media around the world. He defines himself as a humanist, liberal and rational.

One thought on “Mexico’s Next Big Thing: The Sea of Cortez Nautical Ladder

  • Jerry Kelly
    on 2018-09-08

    So the Mexican fishermen are all getting kicked off the sea of Cortez and at the same time this crooked land deal that rob’s the Mexican people of their beautiful land is being carried .out…robbery without pistols

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